Why Nutrition?

health-daily-choices

Over 85% of all health issues stem from what we consume on a daily basis. Food, beverage, and product choices make a big difference in our health and appearance. Our Plan offers you the best choices for optimum weight, health, and well-being.

health-daily-choices

Over 85% of all health issues stem from what we consume on a daily basis. Food, beverage, and product choices make a big difference in our health and appearance. Our Plan offers you the best choices for optimum weight, health, and well-being.

hellman-health-plan-assessment-home-background-arrow-grey

Proper nutrition has been proven significant in healing our bodies.

Nutrition helps with: 

Weight Management

Weight Management starts with understanding how your body reads, stores, and metabolizes food and beverages. Metabolism is the sum of what each of your body’s systems do to burn calories and turn food into energy. Control of food intake starts in the brain and signals the body to store and burn intake. Book a session to learn how your body works so you can control your weight in a natural and effective way.

Allergies, Intolerances, & Sensitivities

Allergies, intolerances, and sensitivities can occur at birth or over time.  Sometimes you can grow out of them and other times it is something you learn to live with.  Substituting certain ingredients can be challenging; therefore, a list of substitutions is always good to have on hand.  Please refer to the allergy and substitution list below as a solid guideline and book a session to learn more.

The eight most common ingredients that trigger food allergies are:

Milk, Eggs, Peanuts, Tree nuts, Fish, Shellfish, Soy, Wheat

If you have allergies or restrictions, use this list for best choice substitutes:

Milk:

Almond milk, Coconut milk, Rice milk, Soy milk.

Eggs:

For binders in a recipe, Substitute:  Arrowroot, Soy Lecithin, Flaxseed mix, Silken Tofu, Unflavored Vegetarian Gelatin Powder, or Pureed Fruits/Vegetables.

(The ratio is, for every egg replaced, 1/4 cup of the substitute is used).

For leavening agents in a recipe, Substitute:  Buttermilk, Yogurt, Baking Soda, Commercial Egg Replacement Powder.

For moisture in a recipe, Substitute:  Fruit Juice, Pureed Fruit, Milk, or Water.

Nuts:

Sunflower seeds, Soy nuts.

Nut butters:

Sunflower seed butter, Soy nut butter, Hummus.

Fish/Shellfish:

For the healthy omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, choose Walnuts, Flaxseed, or Canola instead.

Soy:

Edamame Substitutes:   Green peas, Lima beans.

Miso Substitutes:  Chickpea.

Tofu Substitutes:  Mushrooms.

Silken Tofu Substitutes:  Ricotta cheese, Sour cream, Yogurt.

Soy Milk Substitutes:  Almond milk, Rice milk, Dairy.

Soy Sauce Substitutes:  Mushroom broth.

Textured Vegetable Protein Substitutes:  Hamburger, Quinoa, Bulgur.

Wheat:

Amaranth, Arrowroot, Buckwheat, Corn, Millet, Nut, Potato, Quinoa, Rice, Tapioca.

Diabetes

Diabetes results when there is an imbalance between blood glucose and insulin.  When this occurs your body’s blood sugar levels rise above the normal range.  Often times your pancreas will try to compensate for this imbalance by making more insulin which wears down the pancreas and makes it more difficult to produce adequate amounts of insulin. This can also affect the liver.  Our liver stores the excess glucose, referred to as glycogen.  With diabetes, the regulation of the liver releasing glycogen becomes imbalanced and may release too much sugar when our body doesn’t need it.  High levels of circulating insulin can damage arterial walls to the heart over time which may lead to heart disease.  Therefore, proper diet along with regular exercise is crucial. Book a session to learn more.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in the fats (lipids) of your blood. While your body needs cholesterol to continue building healthy cells, having high cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease. When you have high cholesterol, you may develop fatty deposits in your blood vessels. Eventually, these deposits make it difficult for enough blood to flow through your arteries. Your heart may not get as much oxygen-rich blood as it needs, which increases the risk of a heart attack; as well as, decreased blood flow to your brain which can cause a stroke. Cholesterol is carried through your blood, attached to proteins. This combination of proteins and cholesterol is called a lipoprotein. There are two categories based on what type of cholesterol the lipoprotein carries:

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL). LDL (bad) cholesterol transports cholesterol through your body and builds up in the walls of your arteries, making them hard and narrow.

High-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL (good) cholesterol picks up excess cholesterol and takes it back to your liver.

High cholesterol, also known as hypercholesterolemia, should be treated with proper dietary intake, regular exercise, and medications such as statins. Book a session to learn more.

Blood Pressure/Hypertension

Blood pressure/Hypertension is the pressure at which your blood moves through your arteries, away from your heart. When your heart beats, it squeezes and pushes blood through your arteries to the rest of your body. This force creates pressure on those blood vessels, and that’s your systolic blood pressure. It is not uncommon to have normal changes during exercise or stressful moments, but when you develop hypertension, it means you have chronically high pressure that increases your risk for diabetes and heart disease.  Book a session to learn more including what foods to eat and spices to use to regulate your blood pressure.

Cardiovascular/Heart Disease

Cardiovascular/Heart Disease generally refer to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke. This atherosclerosis condition develops when plaque builds up in the arterial walls making it hard for blood to flow through.  Other heart conditions, such as those that affect your heart’s muscle, valves or rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease.

Think of your heart as the refrigerator in your home; of all the utilities, this is the one you must keep running well all the time.  Learn how to stay heart healthy before problems occur.  If you are already living with heart disease, learn how to reverse damage and live healthier going forward.  Make an appointment to understand the most important utility in your body and how to take care of it from within.

Thyroid and Hashimoto's disease

Thyroid and Hashimoto’s disease: is a condition in which your immune system attacks your thyroid, a small gland that sits low on the front of the neck. The thyroid gland is part of your endocrine system, which produces hormones that coordinate many of your body’s functions. The thyroid secretes several hormones, collectively called thyroid hormones. The main hormone is thyroxine, also called T4 (the 4 denotes the amount of iodine molecules it has). Thyroid hormones act throughout the body, influencing metabolism and body temperature.  Inflammation from Hashimoto’s disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, often leads to an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Taking meds like Levoxyl/Synthroid helps replace the hormones but it is not an exact match to natural thyroxine; therefore, even with synthetic medication it is important to follow a nutrient-dense, anti-inflammatory, lower sodium dietary plan. Book a session to learn more.

Inflammatory Diseases

Arthritis, fibromyalgia, asthma, and Crohn’s are considered Inflammatory Diseases. At times of infection, trauma, or other causes of harm to the body, inflammation plays an important role to protect the injured tissue and start the healing process. It does this by increasing blood flow to the damaged tissue to both deliver blood cells and proteins and wash away unwanted breakdown debris; however, in an inflammatory disease, inflammation occurs by mistake. Increased blood flow and cells arrive at a given site, causing heat, swelling, pain and loss of function when there is no specific infection or trauma. Attacking the body without an external insult in this way is called autoimmunity. Make an appointment to learn more about inflammation and autoimmune disorders and start the healing process today.

Hormonal Imbalances

Lyme's Disease

Lyme’s Disease is difficult to detect and test for. It is usually diagnosed through symptoms because of this.  In regards to Lyme disease, generally speaking, antibiotics work by destroying the cell wall of bacteria; however, the Borrelia Burgdorferi (Bb) bacteria of Lyme can exist without the cell wall which can inevitably make antibiotics useless against it.  During the late stage of Bb the bacteria has established itself in various body tissues but there are studies that indicate penicillin-based antibiotics can still break down the infection although it is not a guarantee. Luckily there are foods and supplements that can help alleviate the symptoms of Lyme disease, making the disease dormant in your body in order to start the healing process by slowing down the infectious bacteria and inflammatory reactions. Make an appointment to learn which foods, vitamins, and minerals specifically help Lyme’s and feel better immediately.  No one should have to live with sickness and pain when there is a solution.

Diverticulosis

Diverticulosis is a condition that occurs when bulging pouches develop in the lining of the large intestine.  When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it can lead to diverticulitis which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, fever, constipation, or diarrhea. Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis.

When an attack occurs, gradually ease back into a regular diet.  Start with low-fiber foods:

Fruit juice, aloe vera juice, canned or cooked fruits without skin, canned or cooked vegetable without skin, broth, tea or gelatin, coffee without cream, ice pops, white bread and rice, egg noodles, yogurt, poultry, fish, eggs. Then, once you start feeling better, slowly introduce high-fiber foods into diet along with regular foods (refer to best choice food list) to help deter future issues:  Whole wheat breads, shredded wheat & bran cereals, whole grain pasta, barley, oatmeal, brown rice, bran muffins, artichokes, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, carrots, peas, spinach, squash, raspberries, blackberries, avocados, pears, apples, prunes, peas, lentils, black beans, lima beans.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon. It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract. There are two types of fiber, soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like material that makes stools softer and larger, allowing them to pass easily through the intestine. Insoluble fiber helps move waste through the digestive system by absorbing water and adding bulk to stools.  Most plant-based foods contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. However, some foods contain more of one kind of fiber than the other.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine (colon). The walls of the intestines are lined with layers of muscle that contract and relax in a coordinated rhythm as they move food from your stomach through your intestinal tract to your rectum. If you have irritable bowel syndrome, the contractions may be stronger and last longer than normal, causing gas, bloating and diarrhea. Or the opposite may occur, with weak intestinal contractions slowing food passage and leading to hard, dry stools.

Abnormalities in your gastrointestinal nervous system also may play a role, causing you to experience greater than normal discomfort when your abdomen stretches from gas or stool. Poorly coordinated signals between the brain and the intestines can make your body overreact to the changes that normally occur in the digestive process. This overreaction can cause pain, diarrhea or constipation.

Common triggers include:

-Foods such as chocolate, saturated fats, certain fruits, excess intake of beans and cruciferous vegetables, milk, carbonated beverages and alcohol can trigger symptoms of IBS.
-Stress, Anxiety, and Depression can up the severity of IBS.
-Hormonal Changes play a role in this condition. Women are twice as likely to suffer from IBS as men.
-Medications taken over time can upset the body’s chemistry and cause symptoms of IBS.
-Fermentable, Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols (FODMAPS) are molecules found in foods and can be difficult for some to absorb and can lead to IBS.  Taking out foods that contain these type molecules is one way to lower the symptoms of IBS but it is a strict and difficult diet to follow for life as most foods contain at least some of these molecules.  It is better to use it as an elimination diet to find the actual culprit foods.

ADHD

PCOS

Alzheimer's

Cancer

Athletic Needs

Pregnancy

Proper nutrition has been proven significant in healing our bodies.

Nutrition helps with: 

Weight Management

Weight Management starts with understanding how your body reads, stores, and metabolizes food and beverages. Metabolism is the sum of what each of your body’s systems do to burn calories and turn food into energy. Control of food intake starts in the brain and signals the body to store and burn intake. Book a session to learn how your body works so you can control your weight in a natural and effective way.

Allergies, Intolerances, & Sensitivities

Allergies, intolerances, and sensitivities can occur at birth or over time.  Sometimes you can grow out of them and other times it is something you learn to live with.  Substituting certain ingredients can be challenging; therefore, a list of substitutions is always good to have on hand.  Please refer to the allergy and substitution list below as a solid guideline and book a session to learn more.

The eight most common ingredients that trigger food allergies are:

Milk, Eggs, Peanuts, Tree nuts, Fish, Shellfish, Soy, Wheat

If you have allergies or restrictions, use this list for best choice substitutes:

Milk:

Almond milk, Coconut milk, Rice milk, Soy milk.

Eggs:

For binders in a recipe, Substitute:  Arrowroot, Soy Lecithin, Flaxseed mix, Silken Tofu, Unflavored Vegetarian Gelatin Powder, or Pureed Fruits/Vegetables.

(The ratio is, for every egg replaced, 1/4 cup of the substitute is used).

For leavening agents in a recipe, Substitute:  Buttermilk, Yogurt, Baking Soda, Commercial Egg Replacement Powder.

For moisture in a recipe, Substitute:  Fruit Juice, Pureed Fruit, Milk, or Water.

Nuts:

Sunflower seeds, Soy nuts.

Nut butters:

Sunflower seed butter, Soy nut butter, Hummus.

Fish/Shellfish:

For the healthy omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, choose Walnuts, Flaxseed, or Canola instead.

Soy:

Edamame Substitutes:   Green peas, Lima beans.

Miso Substitutes:  Chickpea.

Tofu Substitutes:  Mushrooms.

Silken Tofu Substitutes:  Ricotta cheese, Sour cream, Yogurt.

Soy Milk Substitutes:  Almond milk, Rice milk, Dairy.

Soy Sauce Substitutes:  Mushroom broth.

Textured Vegetable Protein Substitutes:  Hamburger, Quinoa, Bulgur.

Wheat:

Amaranth, Arrowroot, Buckwheat, Corn, Millet, Nut, Potato, Quinoa, Rice, Tapioca.

Diabetes

Diabetes results when there is an imbalance between blood glucose and insulin.  When this occurs your body’s blood sugar levels rise above the normal range.  Often times your pancreas will try to compensate for this imbalance by making more insulin which wears down the pancreas and makes it more difficult to produce adequate amounts of insulin. This can also affect the liver.  Our liver stores the excess glucose, referred to as glycogen.  With diabetes, the regulation of the liver releasing glycogen becomes imbalanced and may release too much sugar when our body doesn’t need it.  High levels of circulating insulin can damage arterial walls to the heart over time which may lead to heart disease.  Therefore, proper diet along with regular exercise is crucial. Book a session to learn more.

Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in the fats (lipids) of your blood. While your body needs cholesterol to continue building healthy cells, having high cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease. When you have high cholesterol, you may develop fatty deposits in your blood vessels. Eventually, these deposits make it difficult for enough blood to flow through your arteries. Your heart may not get as much oxygen-rich blood as it needs, which increases the risk of a heart attack; as well as, decreased blood flow to your brain which can cause a stroke. Cholesterol is carried through your blood, attached to proteins. This combination of proteins and cholesterol is called a lipoprotein. There are two categories based on what type of cholesterol the lipoprotein carries:

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL). LDL (bad) cholesterol transports cholesterol through your body and builds up in the walls of your arteries, making them hard and narrow.
High-density lipoprotein (HDL). HDL (good) cholesterol picks up excess cholesterol and takes it back to your liver.

High cholesterol, also known as hypercholesterolemia, should be treated with proper dietary intake, regular exercise, and medications such as statins. Book a session to learn more.

Blood Pressure/Hypertension

Blood pressure/Hypertension is the pressure at which your blood moves through your arteries, away from your heart. When your heart beats, it squeezes and pushes blood through your arteries to the rest of your body. This force creates pressure on those blood vessels, and that’s your systolic blood pressure. It is not uncommon to have normal changes during exercise or stressful moments, but when you develop hypertension, it means you have chronically high pressure that increases your risk for diabetes and heart disease.  Book a session to learn more including what foods to eat and spices to use to regulate your blood pressure.

Cardiovascular/Heart Disease

Cardiovascular/Heart Disease generally refer to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke. This atherosclerosis condition develops when plaque builds up in the arterial walls making it hard for blood to flow through.  Other heart conditions, such as those that affect your heart’s muscle, valves or rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease.

Think of your heart as the refrigerator in your home; of all the utilities, this is the one you must keep running well all the time.  Learn how to stay heart healthy before problems occur.  If you are already living with heart disease, learn how to reverse damage and live healthier going forward.  Make an appointment to understand the most important utility in your body and how to take care of it from within.

Thyroid and Hashimoto's disease

Thyroid and Hashimoto’s disease: is a condition in which your immune system attacks your thyroid, a small gland that sits low on the front of the neck. The thyroid gland is part of your endocrine system, which produces hormones that coordinate many of your body’s functions. The thyroid secretes several hormones, collectively called thyroid hormones. The main hormone is thyroxine, also called T4 (the 4 denotes the amount of iodine molecules it has). Thyroid hormones act throughout the body, influencing metabolism and body temperature.  Inflammation from Hashimoto’s disease, also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, often leads to an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Taking meds like Levoxyl/Synthroid helps replace the hormones but it is not an exact match to natural thyroxine; therefore, even with synthetic medication it is important to follow a nutrient-dense, anti-inflammatory, lower sodium dietary plan. Book a session to learn more.

Inflammatory Diseases

Arthritis, fibromyalgia, asthma, and Crohn’s are considered Inflammatory Diseases. At times of infection, trauma, or other causes of harm to the body, inflammation plays an important role to protect the injured tissue and start the healing process. It does this by increasing blood flow to the damaged tissue to both deliver blood cells and proteins and wash away unwanted breakdown debris; however, in an inflammatory disease, inflammation occurs by mistake. Increased blood flow and cells arrive at a given site, causing heat, swelling, pain and loss of function when there is no specific infection or trauma. Attacking the body without an external insult in this way is called autoimmunity. Make an appointment to learn more about inflammation and autoimmune disorders and start the healing process today.

Lyme's Disease

Lyme’s Disease is difficult to detect and test for. It is usually diagnosed through symptoms because of this.  In regards to Lyme disease, generally speaking, antibiotics work by destroying the cell wall of bacteria; however, the Borrelia Burgdorferi (Bb) bacteria of Lyme can exist without the cell wall which can inevitably make antibiotics useless against it.  During the late stage of Bb the bacteria has established itself in various body tissues but there are studies that indicate penicillin-based antibiotics can still break down the infection although it is not a guarantee. Luckily there are foods and supplements that can help alleviate the symptoms of Lyme disease, making the disease dormant in your body in order to start the healing process by slowing down the infectious bacteria and inflammatory reactions. Make an appointment to learn which foods, vitamins, and minerals specifically help Lyme’s and feel better immediately.  No one should have to live with sickness and pain when there is a solution.

Diverticulosis

Diverticulosis is a condition that occurs when bulging pouches develop in the lining of the large intestine.  When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it can lead to diverticulitis which can cause abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, fever, constipation, or diarrhea. Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis.

 

When an attack occurs, gradually ease back into a regular diet.  Start with low-fiber foods:

Fruit juice, aloe vera juice, canned or cooked fruits without skin, canned or cooked vegetable without skin, broth, tea or gelatin, coffee without cream, ice pops, white bread and rice, egg noodles, yogurt, poultry, fish, eggs. Then, once you start feeling better, slowly introduce high-fiber foods into diet along with regular foods (refer to best choice food list) to help deter future issues:  Whole wheat breads, shredded wheat & bran cereals, whole grain pasta, barley, oatmeal, brown rice, bran muffins, artichokes, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, carrots, peas, spinach, squash, raspberries, blackberries, avocados, pears, apples, prunes, peas, lentils, black beans, lima beans.

 

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon. It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract. There are two types of fiber, soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like material that makes stools softer and larger, allowing them to pass easily through the intestine. Insoluble fiber helps move waste through the digestive system by absorbing water and adding bulk to stools.  Most plant-based foods contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. However, some foods contain more of one kind of fiber than the other.

Book a personal session to understand more about this condition.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine (colon). The walls of the intestines are lined with layers of muscle that contract and relax in a coordinated rhythm as they move food from your stomach through your intestinal tract to your rectum. If you have irritable bowel syndrome, the contractions may be stronger and last longer than normal, causing gas, bloating and diarrhea. Or the opposite may occur, with weak intestinal contractions slowing food passage and leading to hard, dry stools.

Abnormalities in your gastrointestinal nervous system also may play a role, causing you to experience greater than normal discomfort when your abdomen stretches from gas or stool. Poorly coordinated signals between the brain and the intestines can make your body overreact to the changes that normally occur in the digestive process. This overreaction can cause pain, diarrhea or constipation.

Common triggers include:

-Foods such as chocolate, saturated fats, certain fruits, excess intake of beans and cruciferous vegetables, milk, carbonated beverages and alcohol can trigger symptoms of IBS.
-Stress, Anxiety, and Depression can up the severity of IBS.
-Hormonal Changes play a role in this condition. Women are twice as likely to suffer from IBS as men.
-Medications taken over time can upset the body’s chemistry and cause symptoms of IBS.
-Fermentable, Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, and Polyols (FODMAPS) are molecules found in foods and can be difficult for some to absorb and can lead to IBS.  Taking out foods that contain these type molecules is one way to lower the symptoms of IBS but it is a strict and difficult diet to follow for life as most foods contain at least some of these molecules.  It is better to use it as an elimination diet to find the actual culprit foods.

Book a personal session to learn more about IBS.

ADHD

PCOS

Alzheimer’s

Cancer

Athletic Needs

Hormonal Imbalances

Pregnancy

Speak to a licensed professional counselor to discuss your specific needs and get effective results.

Contact our office to book a session: